Tag Archives: Index Construction

Sep 23, 2020

Profitability, Liquidity, and Investability: The Key Drivers of Long-Term Outperformance of S&P SmallCap 600® versus Russell 2000

The S&P 600TM has outperformed the Russell 2000 since its launch in 1994. From Dec. 31, 1994, to Aug. 30, 2020, the S&P SmallCap 600 had an annualized return of 11.77% (with an annualized volatility of 18.96%) versus the Russell 2000’s annualized return of 10.49% (with an annualized volatility of 19.70%). The historical performance divergence…

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Sep 15, 2020

The S&P Global REIT QVM Multi-Factor Index Part II – Performance, Country Composition, and Factor Exposure

In the previous blog, we introduced the construction process of the S&P Global REIT Quality, Value & Momentum (QVM) Multi-Factor Index. In this blog, we look into the empirical results of the strategy. Performance Rebasing the two indices to 100 on June 30, 1999, the S&P Global REIT QVM Multi-Factor Index reached 999.42 on Aug….

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Sep 14, 2020

The S&P Global REIT QVM Multi-Factor Index Part I – Strategy Construction Process

In this blog (and in a subsequent post), we will introduce the S&P Global REIT Quality, Value & Momentum (QVM) Multi-Factor Index. This index integrates individual quality, value, and momentum factor scores into one composite and is designed to capture multi-factor equity premia. In essence, the strategy seeks to include companies with the following characteristics:…

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Jun 8, 2020

Higher Turnover Ahead For S&P 500? Not Necessarily!

The emergence of COVID-19 caused sizeable recalibrations in financial markets as investors grappled with the anticipated impacts on people’s lives and on economic activity.  Given many companies saw significant drops in market capitalizations amid the recent market sell-off, and in light of expectations for companies’ earnings to suffer from reduced economic activity, some may be…

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Apr 11, 2016

Who Fuelled the Oil Bonds Bubble?

It has become popular to blame passive investors and index funds for the recent rise (and fall) in prices for U.S. high yield bonds.  The thesis – placing passive investors as the culprit – goes as follows: There have been material, positive flows into passive bond funds, at the expense of active funds. Passive bond funds…

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