Philip Murphy

Senior Director, Index Governance – Americas
S&P Dow Jones Indices
Biography

Philip Murphy leads Index Governance for the Americas at S&P Dow Jones Indices (S&P DJI). In this role, he is responsible for oversight of all aspects of index determination, as well as administration of index committees, methodologies, and consultations.

Prior to his current role, Philip worked in S&P DJI’s Product Management group, and was responsible U.S. equity and global target date benchmarks, including the S&P 500®, S&P Target Date, and S&P STRIDE. Previously, he worked in S&P DJI’s Channel Management group, where he focused on the defined contribution retirement plan market, and as an analyst in the Global Research & Design group. He writes on a range of topics, and has over twenty years’ experience in financial markets.

Philip is a CFA Charterholder and a member of the New York Society of Security Analysts. He received his undergraduate degree from Queens College of The City University of New York and a master’s in economics from Fordham University.

Author Archives: Philip Murphy

Avoid Unintended Stock Market Bets by Understanding Benchmarks

In a recent Financial Planning article,[1] Craig Israelsen advocated using stock market size segments to construct portfolios rather than a total market approach.  His conclusion may be perfectly valid for market participants willing and able to bear greater small-stock exposure, but his analysis fails to adequately take account of this source of risk.  He compared Read more […]

Don’t Confuse Income With Yield

Yield conventions differ for stocks and bonds, but the various calculation methods for both asset classes have an important characteristic in common—they are alternative expressions of price.  Measures of yield specifically relate current price to how much dividend or interest income holders of a particular security are likely to get.  Thinking of yield as income Read more […]

Whether the Market Is Overvalued or Not, It Can Pay to Rebalance

Current valuations of U.S. stocks inevitably lead to debate over their prospects for future returns, earnings sustainability, and whether we are in the midst of a stock market bubble.  Some measures indicate the market is richly valued by historical standards, but no one knows what the future holds.  However, one thing is clear—the potential value Read more […]

The Much-Maligned Market Portfolio

It seems generally acknowledged that no investment strategy should be expected to offer an optimal trade-off between return and risk in all periods.  Yet I often hear criticism of market-cap weighting, presumably because modern portfolio theory (MPT) postulates a hypothetical market portfolio as efficient in the mean-variance sense.  Financial engineers, product developers, and asset managers Read more […]

Security Selection & Sector Allocation Effects of Equal Weighting the S&P 500®

Constituents of the S&P 500 Equal Weight (EW) and S&P 500 are identical, but the EW version is rebalanced quarterly so that every company has equal representation after the rebalance.  That often results in significantly different performance between the two indices, because equal weighting gives more representation to smaller stocks and alters the distribution of Read more […]

Try a TIPS Mixer in Your Equities Cocktail

As product manager of the S&P STRIDE Indices, I sometimes find myself extolling the virtues of Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS), which I believe are an underappreciated asset class.  When inflation is relatively tame, people often ask why they should think about TIPS.  The answer is that TIPS don’t hedge expected inflation—that’s already priced in.  TIPS Read more […]

Minimizing the Pain of Regret

There are many extraordinarily talented minds engineering optimal portfolios, objectives of which include maximizing return per unit of risk, among others.  The capital asset pricing model (CAPM) posited the market portfolio as optimal in the mean/variance sense, but over the years, this notion has been questioned.  CAPM, like the efficient markets hypothesis (EMH), will likely Read more […]

The Little Engine That Could

Since the U.S. presidential election, headlines touting small-cap performance have almost invariably cited the Russell 2000.  As impressive as that index’s return has been, S&P DJI has a little engine that persistently wins the small-cap race—the S&P SmallCap 600®.  Outperformance of the S&P SmallCap 600 versus the Russell 2000 primarily has to do with two Read more […]

Benchmarking Retirement Withdrawal Strategies

Capital market benchmarks are, of course, widely used yardsticks of investment performance. For the production of the S&P STRIDE Index, in addition to providing performance data we also calculate hypothetical retirement income for vintages of the index that are at, or past, their target date. Hypothetical retirement income is expressed in index points, and can Read more […]

The Price of Retirement

In my last post, I discussed variability in cost and affordability of retirement income.  I used some data from S&P STRIDE, our new benchmark that provides a cradle-to-grave yardstick for wealth accumulation and income generation.  This week, I will look a little closer at how we measure retirement income, as well as its present value Read more […]