Anu Ganti

Director, Index Investment Strategy
S&P Dow Jones Indices
Biography

Anu R. Ganti is Director, Index Investment Strategy at S&P Dow Jones Indices (S&P DJI). The index investment strategy team provides research and commentary on the entire S&P DJI product set, including U.S. and global equities, commodities, fixed income, and economic indices.

Prior to joining S&P DJI, Anu worked in the asset management space, completing a post-MBA rotational program at Russell Investments and working as a portfolio manager focusing on emerging market equities at Parametric Portfolio Associates (subsidiary of Eaton Vance).

Anu is a CFA charterholder and holds an MBA in Finance & Economics from Columbia Business School, and a bachelor’s degree in Finance & Marketing from NYU’s Stern School of Business.

Author Archives: Anu Ganti

Low Volatility and Market Regime Shifts: Lessons From the First Quarter

Since antiquity, people have measured time in months. Unsurprisingly, investors tend to evaluate performance in monthly increments. This can be troublesome, as we will see in the case of low volatility, particularly during market regime changes. Low volatility strategies are designed to provide investors with protection in falling markets and participation in rising markets. Disappointments Read more […]

Investing in a World of Unknown Future Outcomes: The Benefits of Equal Weighting

Consider this thought experiment: You “know” that 499 of the companies in the S&P 500® will return exactly 5% next year. One will return 100%. You have no way to determine which stock will be the big winner, or to know or infer anything about its characteristics. You can invest in either a cap-weighted S&P Read more […]

Large-Cap Energy Stands Out in a Year of Low Volatility

Most sentient investors are aware of the low volatility that characterizes the current environment, with the S&P 500®’s trailing twelve-month annualized volatility at approximately half its level from a year ago. This trend was driven in part by some significant negative inter-sectoral correlations, for example between information technology and real estate versus financials, and energy Read more […]

Active Managers: Hope for high dispersion, not just low correlations

The Wall Street Journal recently reported that, according to analysis by Credit Suisse, the correlation among S&P 500 sectors had fallen close to its lowest level ever, and that this was good for active equity managers, “who find it easier to make money betting on specific companies or trends when stocks aren’t all moving together.” Read more […]

Turning Point?

Here are six notable developments in the U.S. financial markets in September 2017. Smaller caps outperformed large caps. Value outperformed growth. Energy was the top-performing sector, and the utilities sector was the worst-performer. Developed markets posted gains, while emerging markets lost steam. Commodity indices rebounded, driven by recent strength in energy. U.S. 10-year and 30-year Read more […]

Don’t Shoot the Messenger

Here are some recent headlines about the consequences of passive investing: Japan Central Bank’s ETF Shopping Spree Is Becoming a Worry Passive Market Share to Overtake Active in the US No Later than 2024 Passive investing boom is creating a ‘frightening’ risk for markets ETFs are taking over the world, and there’s nothing anyone can Read more […]

Mutual Fund Portfolios: Equal Weight or Cap Weight?

Equal-weighted indices typically outperform their cap-weighted counterparts (although 2017 so far has proven to be an exception to the general rule).  This means that portfolio managers can usually create a performance tailwind by equal weighting rather than cap weighting their holdings. But do they?  One way to assess this question is by using the Herfindahl-Hirschman Read more […]