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Sukuk Market in 2015: Year in Review

Sector Diversification: A Better Way to Track the Chinese Equity Market?

As goes the first week, so goes …

Asian Fixed Income: 2015 Pan Asia Report Card

China’s Stock Market and Its Currency

Sukuk Market in 2015: Year in Review

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Michele Leung

Director, Fixed Income Indices

S&P Dow Jones Indices

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The sukuk market demonstrated resilience despite the decline in oil price and global uncertainty; the Dow Jones Sukuk Index, which tracks USD-denominated, investment-grade sukuk, rose 1.24% in 2015, while the Dow Jones Sukuk High Quality Investment Grade Total Return Index gained 1.00% in the same period.  Looking closer at index constituents, the underperformers were sukuk issued by Saudi Electric, which were weighted down by the lower oil price, and the sovereign sukuk issued by Bahrain and South Africa.

From the supply perspective, we saw sovereign issuers from Malaysia, Indonesia, and Hong Kong, along with a few issuances from banks and a few corporates from GCC and Malaysia in the past year.  There were a total of 15 new sukuk with a total par amount of USD 11.95 billion being added into the Dow Jones Sukuk index, and 48% of them were from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA).  Though the amount of sukuk issued in U.S. dollars tracked by the index dropped in 2015, it is still a respectable level given the challenging market conditions (see Exhibit 1).

In fact, the sukuk issuance from MENA showed a diminishing trend in 2015, according to the Dow Jones Sukuk Index; Bahrain and Saudi Arabia had no issuance, while Qatar only managed to launch one sukuk of USD 750 million.  The United Arab Emirates is the only country in the Dow Jones Sukuk High Quality Investment Grade Total Return Index GCC that maintains stable issuances, and it is also the biggest USD sukuk issuing country, representing 24% of the overall index exposure.

From the demand side, the sukuk was well received overall.  In particular, the Malaysia Sovereign sukuk received strong support from investors across Asia, the U.S., and Europe. While the issuance in Q3 2015 was muted, the sukuk launched in Q4 2015 received a solid order book of two-to-three times oversubscribed.

Among the ratings-based subindices, the bucket rated ‘BBB’ outperformed and rose 2.14% in 2015. Interestingly, the bucket rated ‘AA’ dropped 0.62% in the same timeframe, due to the significant drop in Saudi Electric sukuk, which represents over 60% of the Dow Jones Sukuk AA Rated Total Return Index.  The shorter maturity indices also performed better than the longer maturity ones in 2015.  The Dow Jones Sukuk 3-5 Year Total Return Index rose 2.02% for the year (see Exhibit 2).

Exhibit 1: Total Par Amount of New Sukuk Issuances

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Exhibit 2: Performance of the Dow Jones Sukuk Index Family in 2015

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The posts on this blog are opinions, not advice. Please read our Disclaimers.

Sector Diversification: A Better Way to Track the Chinese Equity Market?

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Ellen Law

Associate Director, Asia Pacific Market Development

S&P Dow Jones Indices

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Different sectors within the same country can perform differently.  Not all sectors of the economy perform well during a bull market and vice versa.  Hence, an investment fund heavily focused on one or two sectors could be more volatile and susceptible to a single market incident or regulatory measure.  In addition, no particular sector can shine in all economic climates and will have ups and downs during different periods.  To attempt to reduce volatility caused by this sector movement, an investment fund (tracking a single country in particular) could track an index with a more diversified sector allocation.

Chinese Equity Indices Concentrate on the Financial Sector
When we take a closer look at some key Chinese indices which track the Chinese equity market, we see that they tend to have a high allocation to the financial sector, some even more than 50%.  In fact, many Chinese financial companies are massive, and some of them are state-owned enterprises supported by the government.  They tend to have large market capitalization and are liquid, enabling them to pass the market-cap and liquidity screens required by the Chinese indices, therefore making them eligible for index inclusion.

However, the Chinese indices selecting the largest stocks tend to overweight the financial sector but underweight other growing sectors that do not have a high market cap.  In order to give an accurate representation of the broad Chinese equity market, an index should be more diversified across different sectors.

The S&P China 500 Enhances Sector Diversification
To approximate the sector composition of the broader Chinese equity market, the S&P China 500 has a unique constituent selection criteria.  This index compares and matches the sector breakdowns of selected stocks in the S&P Total China BMI, which consists of about 3,000 constituents and represents the entire investable universe of Chinese companies.  The S&P China 500 is less concentrated in the financial sector compared with other key China indices (such as the S&P China A 300 Index) and closely matches the sector weights of the broad Chinese equity market, as represented by the S&P Total China BMI (see Exhibit 1).

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The posts on this blog are opinions, not advice. Please read our Disclaimers.

As goes the first week, so goes …

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Tim Edwards

Managing Director, Index Investment Strategy

S&P Dow Jones Indices

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The world’s equity markets have encountered a rocky introduction to 2016; including the worst ever start for the Dow Jones Industrial Average (against a record that stretches back to 1897) and steep falls across developed and emerging markets.  Equity markets are down more or less everywhere, and in many cases materially so.

What difference does a week make?

Does the performance in the first seven days of the year matter to investors who intend to hold through to year-end?  One would suppose not especially: there are 51 weeks to go, we have covered less than 2% of the year and – in the abstract –the first week’s performance should have only a tiny (although certainly non-zero) influence on the whole year’s return.  Yet, history suggests the opposite.  Some weeks were more important than others, and the performance in first week of the year was particularly indicative of the year’s returns.

How important is the first week?

Taking the international blue-chip S&P Global 1200 and its performance over the past 25 years as our object of study (similar results may be obtained with the S&P 500), it is clear that there is a strong historical relationship between the performance during the first week of the year and the overall year’s return, with a positive correlation of 0.41.  Pic1Not all weeks are equally important

Some weeks seem to be more important than others, or even provide an entirely opposite relationship to that expected; the third week in May, for example, seems to be negatively related to performance throughout the remainder of the year. (Support, perhaps, for notion that one should “sell in May and go away”.)Pic2

Which is the most important week?

Perhaps thanks to the return of investors from their holidays and the frequent location of elections during the period, the first week of September appears to be the most influential week for returns.  This is followed by the second weeks of November and March, then the second week of September.  The first week of the year appears in fifth place – still pretty influential, but far from the most important.Pic3

Conclusions

Historically speaking, years that have started badly have more frequently ended badly – and to a greater extent than might be supposed, given the expected impact of a single week’s performance.  However, those who wish to divine the market’s yearly performance from that of a single week might be better off waiting until September.

 

The posts on this blog are opinions, not advice. Please read our Disclaimers.

Asian Fixed Income: 2015 Pan Asia Report Card

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Michele Leung

Director, Fixed Income Indices

S&P Dow Jones Indices

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Despite the weakness in local currencies, the S&P Pan Asia Bond Index, which is designed to track local currency bonds in 10 countries and is calculated in USD, delivered a total return of 1.45% for 2015.  The S&P Pan Asia Corporate Bond Index rose 2.54% in the same period, outperforming the S&P Pan Asia Government Bond Index.

Among the 10 countries tracked by the S&P Pan Asia Bond Index, India was the best-performing country for the year; the S&P BSE India Bond Index rose 8.40% in 2015, while its yield-to-maturity closed at 7.89%.  The S&P China Bond Index went up 8.05%, despite the equity market volatility and slowdown in China.  Though these returns were shy of their double-digit gains of 2014, the gains were robust given the challenging market conditions.  Indonesia had a volatile year, the S&P Indonesia Bond Index managed to reverse its earlier loss in Q3 2015 and ended the year with a 4.35% total return; its yield-to-maturity reached 8.88% and it was the highest-yielding country in the region.

The size of Asia’s local currency bond markets, as measured by the S&P Pan Asia Bond Index increased 21% to USD 8.40 trillion in 2015, which reflected the continuous market expansion.  The market value tracked by the S&P China Bond Index expanded 40% to RMB 36.9 trillion, fueled by the municipal bond replacement program and the growth in the corporate market.

Exhibit 1: Total Return of the S&P Pan Asia Bond Index Series in 2015

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Source: S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC.  Data as of Dec. 31, 2015.  Chart is provided for illustrative purposes only.

Exhibit 2: Yield-to-Maturity of the S&P Pan Asia Bond Index Series

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Source: S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC.  Data as of Dec. 31, 2015.  Chart is provided for illustrative purposes only.

The posts on this blog are opinions, not advice. Please read our Disclaimers.

China’s Stock Market and Its Currency

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David Blitzer

Managing Director and Chairman of the Index Committee

S&P Dow Jones Indices

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The New Year opened with large declines and massive volatility in China’s stock market.  According to US press reports, continuing declines in the value of China’s currency, the RMB, are a major factor in the poor performance of the market. While the RMB has slid against the dollar, falling from 6.21/USD at the beginning of 2015 to 6.59/USD on January 7,  2016, a loss of 5.8%, it appreciated when measured against the Australian dollar, the euro and the British pound.  China’s currency may be weakening, but that is only part of the FX story – the rest is the strengthening of the US dollar.

The table shows how the RMB has moved against the dollar, yen, pound, euro and Australian dollar. Since the beginning of last year the RMB fell vs. the dollar and the yen, was roughly flat against the pound and rose against the euro and the Australian dollar.  Estimates of trade between China and other countries, reported by the People’s Bank of China in constructing a trade-weighted index of the RMB, show that US traded was 26.4% of the total, euro-denominated trade 21.4%, yen-denominated 14.7%, 6.6% in Hong Kong Dollars and the rest spread across eight other currencies. These figures confirm what the table above shows: the RMB is not universally weaker. Rather, its weakness shows up in about half its trade covering the US, Japan and Hong Kong.  With other currencies in other markets, the RMB is stable or appreciating.  While exchange rate shifts of 5% to 10% in a year are large, the RMB’s movement cannot explain most of the difficulties facing the Chinese stock market.

The chart shows the exchange rates measured as indices (RMB per foreign currency) where all indices are based at December 8, 2014 =100.  Since higher numbers mean a weaker RMB, the vertical axis is inverted. The Chinese devaluation of August 10-11, 2015 is clear on the chart.   The sharp declines in the red and blue lines at the lower right are the weakness against the US dollar and the yen.

The posts on this blog are opinions, not advice. Please read our Disclaimers.