Tag Archives: U.S. Equity Market

Weighted earnings: they don’t add up… and you may get burned

This post looks at why index earnings are derived by summing earnings of index constituents without first weighting the earnings by index weight (cap-weight or otherwise). While earnings are probably the most widely followed fundamental item, this explanation is applicable to a data point of one’s choice – operating earnings, cash flow, etc. An easy Read more […]

EU Elections – More important than you think?

The coming week will provide Europeans with a chance to vote in the 2014 EU parliament elections. Nationally and internationally, the contest is viewed as somewhat moot; the majority across the EU will most likely not even vote. But whilst voters in the EU elections are not voting for members of the ECB or its president Mario Draghi, Read more […]

Don’t just do something, sit there.

At the beginning of this year, we suggested that 2013 might well have been a another tough year for active managers. Judging from the response received at the time, this expectation was somewhat controversial: the more common refrain was to point to falling correlations during 2013 and predict a return to “stock-pickers’ market.” In such an environment, Read more […]

Some Inconvenient Truths

Today’s Wall Street Journal brought the latest in a string of articles suggesting that we have entered a period of particular opportunity for active investment management — a so-called “stock-picker’s market.”  Because the average correlation of stocks within the S&P 500 or other major indices has declined, it’s argued, “active managers are going to do Read more […]

Why Size Matters

This morning’s Financial Times revisits the argument that smaller funds generally have a performance advantage over larger funds.  One contention advanced in favor of this view is that as funds grow, they “have” to hold more large-cap stocks, and that this large-cap weighting hurts overall performance: “Outperformance in large-cap companies is harder to achieve because Read more […]

Why U.S. Investors Are Turning to Europe

The New York-listed iShares Europe 350 ETF has more than doubled in size in the past six months; the front page of last Friday’s Financial Times reported that U.S. purchases of European equities have surged, while the Wall Street Journal noted yesterday that “Europe is back.” European equities have underperformed U.S. equities by around 45% Read more […]

Eighty-one years later…

Harbouring year-end reviews and final accounts, the last weeks of December are infused with nostalgia. In this seasonal spirit, I’d like to draw your attention to an under-celebrated piece of work, completed in the year that Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant and Shirley Temple saw their debuts on the silver screen. In 1932, Fred had not Read more […]

Coming Soon to a Dictionary Near You

It may have been 30 years ago, in the early days of stock index futures, that the verb “equitize” (and its cognate noun, “equitization“) came into relatively common use.  The term, if Dr. Johnson will forgive me, meant “to provide equity returns without purchasing equity securities.”  Typically this was accomplished by buying S&P 500 futures — if I Read more […]

The Fed’s QE Dilemma

The US does not have any measurable inflation pressure now nor has it had any over the last 20 years.  The core personal consumption price index, used as the benchmark for inflation by the Federal Reserve (Fed) has been in the 1.25% to 2.5% zone since 1994, averaging about 1.75% for the last 20 years, Read more […]

The Shrinking Supply of Alpha

Recently we attended a conference at which many hedge fund representatives were present. Not surprisingly, there was much discussion of the ability of hedge funds, and by extension active managers generally, to generate alpha. This raises an obvious question: what is the market’s capacity to produce alpha?  Is there a natural limit to investors’ ability Read more […]